Tag Archives: Image Recognition

Image Recognition allows fish to navigate

There are countless practical applications of Image Recognition technology, but for every helpful use, there are plenty of “just because” utilizations of ComputerVision. One such example comes from Studio Diip, a Dutch company that has worked on projects ranging from vegetable recognition to automated card recognition, and which has used technology to allow fish in Continue Reading

ComputerVision steps up soldiers’ game

Photo by Bill Jamieson

ComputerVision has long been of interest to and utilized by the United States government and armed forces, but now it appears as though the army is using this technology to help transform soldiers into expert marksmen. Tracking Point, a Texas-based startup that specializes in making precision-guided firearms, sold a number of “scope and trigger” kits Continue Reading

Pinterest and Getty Images join forces with Image Recognition

Image courtesy of Pinterest

Since its launch in 2010, Pinterest has been the center of a variety of copyright issues, mostly pertaining to the unauthorized use of copyrighted material by users. The biggest problem in all of this is that most users are unknowningly violating copyright laws, which makes it harder to prosecute them. But recently, it seems as Continue Reading

Counting grapes with Computer Vision

Photo courtesy of Carnegie Mellon

It’s not secret that Computer Vision is an asset in the agricultural world, yet it’s still interesting to discover the new ways in which it is being put to you. For example, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute published a study demonstrating how visual counting – one of the elementary Computer Vision concepts – Continue Reading

Computer Vision aids endangered species conservation efforts

Photo by Dr. Paddy Ryan/The National Heritage Collection

In an effort to help protect and conserve endangered species, scientists have been tracking and tagging them for years. However, there are some species that are either too large in population or too sensitive to tagging, and researchers have been working on another way to track them. Now, thanks to SLOOP, a new computer vision Continue Reading