Protecting against invasion of privacy

Facial recognition is a hot topic when it comes to identifying suspects and finding criminals, but these are only ways in which it can help aid society. However, many citizens have voiced concerns that along with facial recognition technology comes an unwanted invasion of privacy, according to an article recently posted on CNN.

This concern, of course, is not new, but the decreasing costs and increasing availability of facial recognition technology have made it much more relavant.

Those who are worried can rest a bit easy; the technology available is not yet intelligent enough to automatically match a face on the street with a person in a computer. Such a search would take hours to complete.

However, there are applications, such as a new iPhone one, which is able to use photos of a person – either real or from the Internet – and compile information such as gender and birthdate, to guess the person’s social security number. Watch the following video for more on this:

http://i.cdn.turner.com/money/.element/apps/cvp/4.0/swf/cnn_money_384x216_embed.swf?context=embed&videoId=/video/technology/2011/10/05/t-ts-iphone-camera-id.cnnmoney

So how do people protect themselves from being photographed against their will? What happens if and/or when facial recognition technology becomes so commonplace that its use extends beyond law enforcement to include business owners and any given person on the street?

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