Computer Vision aids flow cytometry

Photo courtesy of the USCD Jacob School of Engineering

Photo courtesy of the USCD Jacob School of Engineering

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are using Computer Vision as a means of sorting cells, and thus far have been able to do so at a rate of 38 times faster than before. This process of counting and sorting cells is known as  flow cytometry.

The analysis of the cells helps to categorize them based on their size, shape, and structure, and also can distinguish if they are benign or malignant, information that could be useful for clinical studies and stem cell characterization.

While this type of research was occurring before, it’s a job that has traditionally taken a lot of time. But now, the use of a camera on a microscope can analyze information faster–cutting the time from between 0.4 and 10 seconds to observe and analyze a single frame down to between 11.94 and 151.7 milliseconds.

In what ways do you see this technology making advancements in the medical and clinical world? How else can you imagine it benefitting science?

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